Ten animals-most faithful to their spouses
Mar 4, 2008 02:04
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Although monogamy in the animal kingdom is rare, it's far from boring. When a priest ask: "have you resolved to be faithful to your husband?", they say "Yes" . Human beings does this similar thing, but quite a lot of people betrayed their spouses. The following ten animls fulfilled their promises to their spouses, They were regarded as the most loyal animals in terms of love an marriage.
Mar 4, 2008 02:06
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No.1 Prarie Vole

Consider males of this mouse-like species, for example. They will stick with the female they lost their virginity to. Far from eyeing other females, a mated male vole will actually attack other females. Scientists have traced this behavior to hormones in the rodent’s brain, which triggers lasting bond formation and increased aggression toward potential home wreckers.


Mar 4, 2008 02:09
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No.2 Argiope aurantia spiders
Males from many spider species die during or after *, but that's because the females eat them. Male A. aurantia spiders willingly sacrifice themselves while mating: During *, a male will leave one of its mating appendages inside the female's body, where it acts as a kind of organic chastity belt, preventing her from mating with other males.


Mar 4, 2008 02:11
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No.3 Bonnethead shark

  Females of this small hammerhead shark species were thought to mate with several males and store their sperm for later use, so scientists assumed the resulting litter of baby sharks would have several different fathers. It was thus a surprise when studies revealed most litters are sired by the sperm of just one father. The finding suggests the females are either *ually monogamous, mating with only a single male, or that they mate with many males but that the sperm of one out-competes the others.


Mar 4, 2008 02:13
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No.4 Red-backed Salamander

  Male red-backed salamanders will physically and *ually harass their female mates if they suspect infidelity, or even mere associations between the female and other males. But philandering females are used to this, and studies show they are more adept at escaping their aggressive partners compared with socially monogamous females.


Mar 4, 2008 02:15
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No.5 Kirk's dik-dik antelope

  Unlike most *ually monogamous mammals, males of this African dwarf antelope species mate with the female but don't share in the parenting responsibilities.


Mar 4, 2008 02:18
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No.6 Black Vulture

  For black vultures, enforcing monogamy is a family affair: If caught having sex with a bird other than its partner, the vulture gets harassed by not only its mate, but by other vultures in the area.


Mar 4, 2008 02:19
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No.7After the movie "March of the Penguins" came out, many conservative groups cited Emperor penguins as role models for monogamy. While it's true that these flightless Antarctic birds pair up to copulate and raise young, they only stay together for one mating season, after which they normally switch partners.


Mar 4, 2008 02:21
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No.8 Anglerfish

  This deep-sea fish takes monogamy to a bizarre new level. When mating, a male anglerfish bites into the flesh of his female mate, attaching to her body. His mouth fuses with her skin, and their bloodstreams merge. Once joined, the male degenerates until he's simply a source of sperm for the female. A female will often have several males attached to her at once.


Mar 4, 2008 02:23
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No.9 Wolf

  Like penguins, wolves practice serial monogamy, meaning they can have several mates throughout a lifetime, but only one at a time. A female wolf will typically mate with one male, but will take another if her mate dies, gets kicked out of the pack or is so injured or sick that he can't breed.


Mar 4, 2008 02:25
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No.10 Bald eagles

  The poster birds for fidelity, bald eagles are monogamous and remain faithful to each other until one dies. Recent studies of DNA from the feathers of other eagle species support the idea that monogamy is the norm among raptors.


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